First Voice EID upgrades NOW AVAILABLE!

January 23, 2011
Emergency Instruction Device (EID)

Talking First Aid Book / First Aid Calculator

ECC / AHA & National First Aid Science Upgrades were released in late 2010.  For more information on this see our blog post from October:

https://thinksafe.wordpress.com/2010/10/19/the-2010-guidelines-for-cpr%E2%80%A6/

Think Safe’s First Voice EID is ready for CPR/First Aid upgrades to be sent to you, our dealers and customers!

Part No. DC01: The $29 upgrade is sent in a datacard and can be easily inserted/changed by following the user instructions sent with the upgrade.  

Dealers please contact us for further information on how to provide your customers easy upgrades (email:mmaly@think-safe.com).

The First Voice EID is the only Emergency Instruction Device / Talking First Aid Book / First Aid Calculator on the market for business use, containing all first aid & CPR AHA manual current protocols.  The device is easy to upgrade through an accessible dataport on the back of the device as first aid & CPR protocols do change every 3-5 years through scientific studies and advances in first aid / CPR science.

2010 updates implemented in 2011 on the EID protocols include:  CPR updates to include compression depth & C-A-B changes for trained rescuers and hands only CPR for untrained rescuers, education & recognition of gasping vs. normal breathing, and advised AED use for infants.  First Aid updates include additional heat stroke advice, jellyfish sting updated care,  clarification on aspirin use for heart attack symptoms, both US and Canadian Poison Control contact information, bleeding wound care updates (elevation, pressure points, tourniquet, compression bandage use), additional information on when to suspect head, neck or spinal injuries, and snakebite first aid care updates.

Please contact us today for your upgrade:

(email:pwickham@think-safe.com or 888/473/1777)

SafetyMate Trade-in: $50 Value!

Or, if you have an outdated SafetyMate model

NOW is the time to upgrade to First Voice:

$50 REBATE on ANY SafetyMate exchanged

& First Voice EID (AVU5001) ordered!

Expires:  3/31/2011

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What are the reoccurring budget items for my AED program?

December 22, 2010

There are 5 potential budget items that affect your AED program.  Note that any non-compliance, where necessary, leads to a break down in your AED program and does open you to potential for legalities.  Once you have an AED program, remember to budget for these items where applicable!

1)       Electrode Pads – The majority of the AED models on the market have a 2 year electrode pad life.  The date of the expiration is clearly marked on the pad package, an example is shown on this posting for the Philips FRx Rugged AED.  Some AED models do have 3.5 yr expiry dates up to 5 yr expiry dates, however. Dates vary due to packaging mechanisms but be sure to follow manufacturer guidelines and expiration dates provided.  The electrode pads will dry out and prevent proper AED functioning/use if they are not replaced as needed.  Pads range in price from $35-$120, depending on make and model owned.

2)       Batteries – The majority of the AED models on the market have a 3-5 year warranty and lifespan.  The date of the expiration is also clearly marked on the battery.  Various models will warranty the devices for xx years AFTER initial install so be sure to clearly mark your records on WHEN you install the battery for these models.  Also, the HeartSine Samaritan and Physio Conrol / Medtronic CR Plus Lifepak or Lifepak Express models have a combo pack you purchase with battery/pads being replaced simultaneously.  Defibtech / Cintas does sell a model that has a suggested annual replacement of an off-shelf 9V battery (this ensures their AED performs proper self-testing).  AED batteries range in price from $75-$400, depending on make and model owned.

3)       Training – AED acquirer state laws many times dictate that you have to ensure expected users are trained in American Heart or Red Cross or equal CPR & AED certified courses (American Safety & Health Institute, Medic First, Health & Safety Institute, Emergency Care & Safety Institute, American Health Association, etc).  These certifications range depending on which training org you use but every 1-2 years the certification expires and needs to be renewed.  Courses can be obtained locally at Red Cross locations or through the American Heart Association network but also there are over 100,000 instructor throughout the US alone and there are local training centers that can provide a competitive price for CPR & AED, First Aid, and Bloodborne Pathogen or Universal Precautions plus other more advanced or supplemental add-on training classes.  Various online solutions are also available.  Think Safe has a listing of US training centers and online solutions; contact us at or info@think-safe.com if you would like to contact a local trainer in your area.

4)       Program Manager Software / Database – AED acquirer state laws many times also dictate that the AED has to be maintained to manufacturer and industry standards.  This standard generally a 30 day check.  Many companies have their own database solution for ensuring equipment is checked regularly and records of these checks are kept on file (big companies).  If you do not, there are online solutions that are inexpensive but key in helping to not only auto-notify your AEDs are checked to standards but also the log and records of all AEDs are filed and backed up regularly for legal protection.  A nice comprehensive  UNLIMITED user solution at $25-$50/location (customer) can be seen here, showing it’s full capabilities:  http://www.firstvoice.us/FirstVoiceAEDManagerVideo/tabid/751/Default.aspx

5)       Medical Oversight – AED acquirer state laws in approximately 20 states requires a licensed physician or “certified healthcare provider” to oversee the AED program.  This is NOT an Rx!  Proper Medical Oversight includes sign-off by the appropriate license owner referred to in that state law on:  AED/CPR training of the organization (who is trained, how often, what they are trained on); AED placement and markings; AED communication; AED policy; AED maintenance & upkeep procedures.  Contact Think Safe at if you are not sure if your state requires medical oversight.  Medical Oversight costs anywhere from $75/AED to $350/AED or some companies chose to hire medical direction and pay a retainer annually.  Think Safe has a national network of medical directors and can provide a quote for efficient medical oversight for your organization, charging you for locations ONLY where mandates require it. In some cases, we can connect you with a local FREE source for medical oversight.  Call for more details.  AED distributors/dealers are encouraged to call as well.

Think Safe [VIEW OUR BIO] is a certified Women-Owned Business (WBENC) providing first aid & defibrillator expertise to clients since 2004. Known for technical assistance to customers on: [State AED acquirer laws] [AED funding sources and grants] [AED program management solutions] including [Medical Oversight] [& Online AED database / record-keeping compliance software].

References available . Please feel free to contact us at 888-473-1777 or complete the following form and we will be happy to get in touch with you!

 

 


School Mandates for AEDs Slowed by Economy

December 14, 2010

I recently read this article:  http://www.northjersey.com/news/health/111835889_Defibrillator_bill_stalled_over_funds.html

There are several very good points made in this article.

Of note is that these lifesaving devices can be purchased for $1000 or under and AED packages (cabinet, etc) are $1000 to $1500.  And, companies and facilities should want to purchase and maintain the devices under their own lead, not based upon being MANDATED to buy.

I know of several MANDATED customers (schools, fitness clubs, gyms, etc) where they – without hand holding and an easy database solution that is inexpensive – DID NOT hold up their end of the bargain historically due to the absence of an AED program Champion.    Pads expire, Batteries expire, devices go unchecked and management is crossing their fingers [and toes] that the device works when it is needed at their location (if it is even remembered to be used).

The key is that these devices save lives, they should not be mandated, they should be affordable and easy to maintain.  THEY SAVE LIVES and let’s not forget that Sudden Cardiac Arrest is the biggest killer annually in the U.S.

How can you fund an AED?  There are grants – email us for a copy of “THE FOUNDATION OF FUNDING AEDS” – FREE, COMPLIMENTARY and no strings attached!

EMAIL:   grants@think-safe.com (subject – COPY OF FOUNDATION OF FUNDING AEDS)

How can you make sure the AED is constantly in compliance and checked regularly for under $25 – 50/yr at your location?  Check out the following link; then contact us at 888-473-1777 or complete the form below and we will be happy to get in touch with you!

http://www.firstvoice.us/Products/FirstVoiceAEDProgramManager/tabid/727/Default.aspx

It seems that the answer to placing the devices are not mandates but rather, proper funding and program solutions for the long term!   We can always be reached at  as well at the contact info below, and we are happy to give you our technical insights into accessible funding sources and cost reductions, where applicable!

Making Minutes Matter

Think Safe Blog /grants@think-safe.com (888.473.1777)


AHA Updates Guidelines for CPR and ECC in 2015

October 19, 2010

CPR-Thrust-AEDThe American Heart Association (AHA) has released new guidelines and best practices for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC). These guidelines have been updated to improve rescue time and make the process easier.

Although the changes from the 2010 guidelines are, for the most part, minimal, they emphasize such important things as cell phone use in an emergency, clarified rates of compression during CPR, etc.

Over the next months, we will work diligently to update materials, training courses, and products to reflect these changes so that we can continue being a comprehensive, reliable resource for your safety needs.

For a quick breakdown of the AHA CPR and ECC guideline updates, or other questions, simply fill out the form below, and we will be happy to provide you with the information. 


 

 


AED Site Risk Assessment: Part2

June 9, 2010

AED Site Risk Assessment

Many times we get asked at Think Safe the question, “How much risk do I have for someone  having a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) here?”

In the previous blog post we spoke about determining the level of risk at your facility and if your facility was at higher risk for having a SCA (Sudden Cardiac Arrest) event. We also provided a list of higher risk facilities.

If you want to now move on to assessment tools, here are some questions to answer:

1) Is it unlikely that the existing EMS system would be able to reliably achieve a “call- to-shock” interval of five minutes or less at this site?

2) Has an SCA incident occurred at this site in the past five years and have the demographics of the population served by this site remained relatively constant?

3) Do 10,000 or more persons regularly gather at this location?

4) Does this site have a large concentration of persons over 50 years old?

5) Is there a high probability of SCA at this site based upon this formula:

A. Take the number of individuals at your location and multiply this number by the % of people age 50 or over.
B. Multiply this number by the average number of hours spent at the location each day.
C. Multiply this number by 350 if the location is residential or 250 if the location is non-residential.
D. If your answer is 600,000 or higher, your location has a high probability of SCA.

If you answered YES to any of the above questions you are at higher risk of having an SCA event and you need to talk to our technical experts or a local rep.

Think Safe can provide a full AED Site Assessment Survey for your use and one of our local representatives would be happy to perform on onsite AED placement assessment.  Think Safe’s First Voice product line includes a full line of AEDs and AED accessories.  From low cost and rugged solutions our product catalog has what you need to put in place an effective and protective AED program.

For more information, contact one of our AED experts at 888-473-1777 or complete the following form and we will be happy to get in touch with you!


New Emergency Instruction Device (EID) Launches in Europe

April 26, 2010

Think Safe is proud to write about our 2010 European EID that is now available in Dutch and European English.  For Please see:  http://bit.ly/RescueMate for full details.

"RescueMate"

European EID – RescueMate

This EID has everything you need and is European & ECC compliant:
– first aid, AED and CPR training and emergency use
– fire training
– evacuation training
– communication training

A full occupational health tool for any workplace or organization!

COMING SOON!  German and French languages

For more details on how to distribute this product, please contact us at 888-473-1777 or complete the form below and we will be happy to contact you.


CPR Facts & Statistics

September 22, 2009

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  • About 75-80% of all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests happen at home, so being trained to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can mean the difference between life and death for a loved one.
  • Effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double a victim’s chance of survival.
  • CPR helps maintain vital blood flow to the heart and brain and increases the amount of time that an electric shock from a defibrillator can be effective.
  • Approximately 95% of sudden cardiac arrest victims die before reaching the hospital.
  • Death from sudden cardiac arrest is not inevitable. If more people knew CPR, more lives could be saved.
  • Brain death starts to occur four to six minutes after someone experiences cardiac arrest if no CPR and defibrillation occurs during that time.
  • If bystander CPR is not provided, a sudden cardiac arrest victim’s chances of survival fall 7-10% for every minute of delay until defibrillation. Few attempts at resuscitation are successful if CPR and defibrillation are not provided within minutes of collapse.
  • Coronary heart disease accounts for about 450,000 of the nearly 870,000 adults who die each year as a result of cardiovascular disease.
  • Approximately 310,000 of all annual adult coronary heart disease deaths in the United States are suffered outside the hospital setting and in hospital emergency departments. Of those deaths, about 166,200 are due to sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Sudden cardiac arrest is most often caused by an abnormal heart rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF). Cardiac arrest can also occur after the onset of a heart attack or as a result of electrocution or near-drowning.
  • When sudden cardiac arrest occurs, the victim collapses, becomes unresponsive to gentle shaking, stops normal breathing and after two rescue breaths, still isn’t breathing normally, coughing or moving.

Get CPR certified through our Online Training, or keep step-by-step instructions on how to handle an emergency CPR event with our CPR Coach iPhone App!